Agile Testing book club: Everyone is a Tester

If you’ve even dipped your toe into the online testing community, there’s a good chance that you’ve heard Agile Testing by Janet Gregory and Lisa Crispin as a recommended read. A couple weeks ago I got my hands on a copy and thought it would be a useful exercise to record the highlights of what I learn along the way. There is a lot in here, and I can tell that what resonates will be different depending on where I am mentally at the time. What I highlight will no doubt be just one facet of each chapter, and a different one from what someone else might read.

So, my main highlight from Chapters 1 and 2:

everyone is a tester

Janet and Lisa immediately made an interesting distinction that I would never have thought of before: they don’t use “developer” to refer to the people writing the application code, because everybody on an agile team is contributing to the development. I really like emphasizing this. I’m currently in an environment where we have “developers” writing code and “QA” people doing tests, and even though we’re all working together in an agile way, I can see how those labels can create a divide where there should not be one.

Similarly surprising and refreshing was this:

Some folks who are new to agile perceive it as all about speed. The fact is, it’s all about quality—and if it’s not, we question whether it’s really an “agile” team. (page 16)

The first time I encountered Agile, it was positioned by managers as being all about speed. Project managers (as they were still called) positioned it as all about delivering something of value sooner than possible otherwise, which is still just emphasizing speed in a different way. If asked myself, I probably would have said it was about being agile (i.e., able to adapt to change) because that was the aspect of it that made it worth adopting compared to the environment we worked in before. Saying it’s all about quality? That was new to me, but it made sense immediately, and I love it. Delivering smaller bits sooner is what lets you adapt and change based on feedback, sure, but you do that so you end up with something that everyone is happier with. All of that is about quality.

So now, if everybody on the team should be counted as a developer, and everything about agile is about delivering quality, it makes perfect sense that main drive for everybody on the team should be delivering that quality. The next step is obvious: “Everyone on an agile team is a tester.” Everyone on the team is a developer and everyone on the team is a tester. That includes the customer, the business analysts, the product owners, everybody. Testing has to be everybody’s responsibility for agile-as-quality to work. Otherwise how do you judge the quality of what you’re making? (Yes, the customer might be the final judge of quality means to them, but they can’t be the only tester any more than a tester can be.)

Now, the trick is to take that understanding and help a team to internalize it.

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